How to stand out in a crowded brandscape

Entrepreneurs and startups need to push their brands hard. It’s encouraging that more and more new businesses and startups are entering the commercial arena. Growth of new companies means growth of new brands, making it more difficult to be seen,…

How to stand out in a crowded brandscape

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Entrepreneurs and startups need to push their brands hard.
It’s encouraging that more and more new businesses and startups are entering the commercial arena. Growth of new companies means growth of new brands, making it more difficult to be seen, heard and noticed.

Startups are notorious lax in paying attention to their brands. This is understandable – they have a mountain of details and issues that demand their attention. While items such as sales, product development, finance and customer service are pressing, the brand is left to take care of itself.

There is an argument, and one which I have often made, that if you get all the other things right, you will get the brand right. The brand is the business. However in an increasingly crowded brandscape, effort is needed ensure a fair share of voice.

This does not necessarily mean throwing money or effort at promotion. It means being aware of the need for differentiation, and taking appropriate action.

Put your brand under the magnifying glass
The good news is, you probably have the differentiators already. The trick is to ask the right questions.

What is it about your product or service that makes it special? You don’t need to go looking for the big deals – it’s often the little things that make a difference. What things make you that little bit different from everyone else.
What is it that makes your business special? Think about the way you do things – what’s special in your approach. What about your story? Why are you doing what you do, what was your journey – every business has its own special narrative – what’s yours?
What about your people – what makes them special, different, quirky – what’s the background?
What about the real benefit you offer? How does that differ from your competitors?
Within those four questions probably lie some real differentiators you can use to stand out from the crowd. Sometimes you can be too close to the business to see them – so ask somebody else, friends, advisers, customers.

Feelings matter
Don’t be afraid that the key differences may look likesoft’ items rather than hard facts. The most important influences on brand choice are often emotional rather that pragmatic. It’s what people feel about your brand rather than what they know.

Once you’ve spotted the differentiators, write them down. Start to plan how you can emphasise and underline them.

Traditionally, the advice was to apply the ‘marketing mix’ to find points of differentiation (remember the four ‘P’s – Product, Price, Place and Promotion?). Great guidance, if you have clear points of difference. The problem is that many startups or small businesses are operating on marginal distinctions.

Be bold – dare to be different
This is where you need to be bold in your approach. Don’t be afraid to stand out. Be prepared to do what is necessary – but do it differently.

Here are a few key thoughts that may stimulate ways you may differentiate your brand offer:

Think five senses – visual, tactile, sound, smell, taste
Privacy and security – key themes for today
Change your category
Technology – keep an eye on new ways to do what you do
Look for niches – they can be different, quirky and profitable
Create a new product or service – it’s only a name
Customer service – don’t just be excellent, be different
Be personal
Environmentally relevant and sustainable
Don’t be afraid to be exclusive
Use colour
Use showmanship if you’re in a ‘me-too’ category
User experience – make it different – fun, exciting, challenging?
Specialise – you don’t have to sell to everyone
Vision – use your dream or philosophy – purpose and passions
Heritage – where you come from – geographically or historically
Your people – they’re special
Break your industry or sector rules

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